Urban Rural Divide

Derek A Peterson
Derek A Peterson
@derek-a-peterson
4 weeks ago
46 posts

Media messages that amplify cliches and affect the understanding of rural life.

As sources for stories, rural folks have rarely been portrayed in a realistic light. One of the earliest and most popular depictions of rural life in popular culture was the comic strip "Li'l Abner." Al Capp grew up in New Haven, Connecticut, and his closest connection with rural life was a teenage hitchhiking trip through Appalachia. But that didn't stop him from producing the comic strip that, at the height of its popularity in the 40s and 50s, was carried by nearly 900 newspapers in the U.S. for a combined circulation of 60 million. It created the stereotype of the "hillbilly," launched the national phenomenon of Sadie Hawkins Day dances, and spawned a Broadway musical, two films and a theme park. But the strip portrayed Appalachian poor people – and rural people in general – as uneducated, stupid rubes totally lacking in worldly experience and common sense.

When television came along, the hillbilly tradition expanded into shows like "The Andy Griffith Show," "The Beverly Hillbillies," "Green Acres," "Hee Haw" and "The Dukes of Hazzard." For a time in the early 60s, these were some of the most popular shows on TV.

Valerie Kaliff InterviewIn the movies, hillbilly pop culture took a very dark turn with "Deliverance." The uneducated hillbilly rubes of Li'l Abner became retarded and crippled misfits and savage sexual predators in the movie. These rural sadists terrorize a quartet of Atlanta urbanites on a canoe trip.

"Deliverance" spawned a sub-genre of exploitation movies that capitalized on the fear that some urban residents feel when visiting isolated rural areas. The "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" series, "The Hills Have Eyes," and "Children of the Corn" were all premised on the fatal encounter between modern suburbanites and rural brutes.

Valerie Kaliff (left) understands that rural areas can have a sense of mystery and maybe even foreboding for urban folks. "It is unnerving to people because it is so quiet and still and you can hear the croaks or the frogs and the animals and the coyotes howl," she says. "And it is eerie for people if you're not used to it."

https://livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe70s/life_08.html


updated by @derek-a-peterson: 07/06/21 12:49:57PM
Derek A Peterson
Derek A Peterson
@derek-a-peterson
4 weeks ago
46 posts

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2020/01/03/five-myths-about-rural-america/

#1: ‘Rural’ is synonymous with ‘Midwestern’
#2: ‘Rural’ is synonymous with ‘white’
#3: ‘Rural’ is synonymous with ‘conservative’
#4: Rural Americans don’t care about the news
#5: Rural America is the ‘real’ America

Derek A Peterson
Derek A Peterson
@derek-a-peterson
4 weeks ago
46 posts

Debunking the Myths - https://www.urban.org/urban-wire/debunking-three-myths-about-rural-america


Debunking Three Myths about Rural America






How to improve research and reporting for the 2020 election and beyond








News media and scholarly reporting frequently misrepresent or misunderstand rural America. Few examples illustrate this more than the wake of the 2016 election, when droves of largely nonrural reporters flocked to rural communities to find out what happened.

Although much has been written critiquing such drive-by journalism, narrow and reductive depictions of rural America persist. This storytelling contributes to growing mistrust of outside researchers and reporters, and the oft-described rural-urban divide erases rural diversities and unduly polarizes differences between cities and small towns.






updated by @derek-a-peterson: 07/06/21 12:59:05PM
Derek A Peterson
Derek A Peterson
@derek-a-peterson
4 weeks ago
46 posts

https://anthropology-news.org/articles/radical-media-challenges-rural-stereotypes/











In Brazil and Kentucky, rural populations are producing media content to take on marginalization and discrimination in their communities.





updated by @derek-a-peterson: 07/06/21 12:59:56PM
Derek A Peterson
Derek A Peterson
@derek-a-peterson
4 weeks ago
46 posts

Rural Prosperity Report if you are interested, I can email it you. Just ask. (Or search for it online - through the Aspen Institute.)

Angie K
Angie K
@angie-k
4 weeks ago
8 posts

Are you referring to the "In Search of 'Good' Rural Data?"

Aspen Institute has several reports.  Very interesting site.  I spent some time surfing around.  Now I have even MORE reading to do.

Derek A Peterson
Derek A Peterson
@derek-a-peterson
4 weeks ago
46 posts

Good morning Angie, Yes, the Rural-Property-Report-5.4.20.pdf. (The file was too large 3.6 MB to attach.)

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